Brent Reading

Brent-Reading

Prior to joining the bar, Brent practiced as a commercial litigator with Minter Ellison (from 2011-2013) and with Allens (from 2013-2015).

 Brent was called to the Bar in 2015.

 Brent has a broad commercial practice with a focus on contract, employment law, tort, insolvency, construction, trade practices, discrimination, intellectual property, dust diseases, body corporate disputes and wills and estates.

In 2017, Brent was recognised by Doyle's Guide as an emerging construction and infrastructure junior counsel.  Brent is a co-author of the Intellectual Property and Probate Chapters (which are published by LexisNexis Australia).

 Since joining the Bar, Brent has appeared in numerous trials and interlocutory applications before the State and Federal Courts. Some examples include:

  •  appearing as counsel in proceedings involving breaches of company sale agreements before the Supreme Court of Queensland;
  •  appearing as counsel in proceedings involving breaches of the Trade Marks Act 1995 (Cth) before the Federal Court of Australia;
  •  appearing as counsel in proceedings involving restraint of trade and breaches of confidential information before the Supreme Court of Queensland;
  •  appearing as counsel on behalf of various body corporates for the recovery of unpaid levies and other debts;
  •  appearing as counsel in proceedings for various banks and financial institutions before the Supreme Court of Queensland;
  •  appearing as counsel in proceedings commenced under the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) before the Federal Court of Australia (in particular, proceedings involving sham arrangements, unlawful industrial activity and workplace rights);
  •  appearing as junior counsel in proceedings regarding calls on bank guarantees before the Supreme Court of Queensland.

 Brent also regularly provides written opinions on various issues including:

  •  the construction of written contractual agreements, including partnership agreements, sale agreements and retail leases;
  •  the prospects of proceedings before the State and Federal Courts;
  •  the admissibility of disclosed evidence, including expert evidence;
  •  the prospects of recovery for insurers who are subrogated to their insured’s rights; and
  •  procedural steps in relation to proceedings before the State and Federal Courts.

In addition to his role as a barrister, Brent also lectures in forensic evidence at Griffith University. He has done so since 2015.